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How To Pick Your Fishing Line Color

How To Pick Your Fishing Line Color

How To Pick Your Fishing Line Color

Choosing your fishing line color is not about making yourself look good on the water. It is an integral part of fishing success that can really make the difference between an okay day out and a great one. No fisherman or woman wants to end a fishing trip empty-handed, and choosing the right color fishing line can play a major part in giving you the best chance possible to net the fish.

The best line will always be the one that is the least noticeable to fish. This may seem like common sense, but it is not necessarily as easy of a choice as it might sound. This is because the line color will depend on a range of factors, including where you are fishing and what sort of water it is.

Clear line

Many novices think that simply choosing any old clear line will do. In one sense, they are not wrong. Clear line is often the best choice for family fishing trips and if you are not that interested in catching the biggest or the best fish. Clear line is a multi-use selection that can serve its purpose but may not be specialized enough if getting the fish to bite is the only purpose of your trip. If fishing for you is more about the enjoyment of relaxing on or beside the water and getting a nibble is a nice added extra, pop that clear line in your cart and check out at the store.

Seaguar InvizX 600 12VZ600 Fluorocarbon Fishing Line

Even if you do take your fishing a little more seriously, clear line is not necessarily a bad choice, especially if you choose a fluorocarbon option such as Seaguar InvizX 600 12VZ600 Fluorocarbon Fishing Line. Many expert anglers swear by this type of line, agreeing with the manufacturers that fluorocarbon’s ability to refract light in the same way as water makes it the best possible choice. This type of line is said to bend the light as if it were a liquid, meaning that many anglers think this is the best choice if you want a line that is as invisible to fish as possible. In addition to clear fluorocarbon line, there is also a pink version, which experts claim can be even more invisible. The science says that pink colors can disappear underwater, which means that this could be one to try if you want to find the most unobtrusive line you can.

Blue and green lines

If you want fishing line that blends into the water, it is no surprise that blues and greens are a popular choice. Which one you choose will generally depend on where you are going fishing and which tone the water matches best. If in doubt, go for green - such as Seaguar Smackdown Flash Green 20SDFG150 8 Strand Braid - as, while you may think of water as being blue, most areas have more of a green tone. This makes green line a more versatile choice or the safest bet if you’re not sure which one to choose.

Seaguar Smackdown Flash Green 20SDFG150 8 Strand Braid

Red line

Just as with the pink fluorocarbon line, there is a thought pattern that says that because red colors can disappear underwater, red line may be a good choice. This is debatable, however, as divers have reported that reds look black beneath the water, so this may mean that it is not the most invisible choice after all. There are still advocates for this type of line, though, with some fishermen claiming that the coloring is similar to blood, which may be attractive to some fish. You will have to decide for yourself if you think that red line is a good choice or not.

Yellow and neon green

These bright colors may seem like a strange option when the whole idea is to disguise your line from the fish, but there are times when you may need to accept a trade-off and use a brighter line that you can see. This may be because you are fishing in very dirty or muddy water or you simply need extra visibility when you’re watching your line for a bite.

Yellow Fishing Line

As mentioned previously, the line you choose will depend on where you are fishing, but you will also need to make some decisions about which you prefer. Experimenting is always a good idea to find out what line works best for you in different locations and circumstances, and who wouldn’t want to use this excuse to go out and fish a little more?